Crimson Sometimes Like Fire

Crimson Sometimes Like Fire

When I put the flower in my hair like the Andalusian girls,
there’s pansies, those are for thought –
they scatter and drop long before the night is dew.

Shall I wear a red, I’ll start dressing myself to go out:
tomorrow is St. Valentine’s Day,
when I put the flower in my hair like the Andalusian girls.

And the night we missed the boat and kissed under the Moorish wall,
I would give you some violets, candy-sweet, but
they scatter and drop long before the night is dew.

What flowers are those they invented like the stars –
my cornet, with long purples, trophies, and spread wide
when I put the flower in my hair like the Andalusian girls.

I’ll be fragrant and lush, intoxicating oils and sheen,
a fancy heel for dancing and fairy-lights from drink –
they’ll scatter and drop long before the night is dew.

Flowers of the mountain, we are all flowers half, open at night,
spread wide and mermaid like, come to my bed
when I put the flower in my hair like the Andalusian girls
they scatter and drop long before the night is done.

—–
Na/GloPoWriMo Day Five prompt >”today we’d like to challenge you to write a poem that incorporates at least one of the following: (1) the villanelle form, (2) lines taken from an outside text, and/or (3) phrases that oppose each other in some way. If you can use two elements, great – and if you can do all three, wow!”

Most of the lines in my villanelle are borrowed from the monologues of two literary characters who have been in my thoughts lately.  Do you know who they are?  (note – I did not attempt to rhyme, although a villanelle traditionally has a rhyme scheme.)

Villanelles are also April’s dVerse poetic form.

SarahSouthwest explains the form as “a nineteen-line poetic form consisting of five tercets followed by a quatrain. There are two refrains and two repeating rhymes, with the first and third line of the first tercet repeated alternately until the last stanza, which includes both repeated lines. The villanelle is an example of a fixed verse form. The word derives from Latin, then Italian, and is related to the initial subject of the form being the pastoral.”

15 thoughts on “Crimson Sometimes Like Fire

      1. She’s so intriguing and strong in her own way. I have a half-formed idea for a different Ophelia poem currently tumbling around.

        Like

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